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Court Trial Guide


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Trial Guide

 

The Himera Roleplay legal system is loosely based on already instated legal practices but has been modified to fit server needs. All information in this document is subject to change.

In order to represent others or yourself as a lawyer in court you MUST have passed the BAR exam.

 

 

Objection Cheat Sheet

 

Relevance: A Question or Evidence that does not relate to the issue at hand.

 

Leading: Asking a Question that leads to a "Yes" or "No" answer (Allowed on Cross-Examination).

Example: "Isn't it true that...?" "Did you...?"

 

Hearsay: Out of court statement made by someone other than the witness reporting it. 

Example: Bob states that Robert's best friend told him that he did it.

 

Speculation: When the witness has to assume details.

Example: "I think..." "I guess..." "Maybe..." (Witness may Speculate on their Expertise) 

 

Facts Not in Evidence: Presenting evidence not already declared as evidence.

 

Lack of Foundation: Questions have to go in order of events and establish groundwork - no jumping around.

Example: "You saw this, and that led to this, which then led to this!"

 

Non-Responsive Witness: Witness does not answer questions asked or avoids them entirely.

 

Asked and Answered: Question has already been addressed and answered by the witness.

 

Character Evidence: Assuming someone's behavior. (Medical Experts may speculate on someone's tendencies).

 

Compound Question: Asking more than one question per answer.

 

Vague Question: It is not clear what is being asked.

 

Badgering: Intimidating the witness.

 

Argumentative: Inserting an argument into their question. 

Example: "Did you do this because of this?"

 

Starting the Trial: 

           Charges and Pleadings:

           The judge will ask the prosecutor what charges/allegations are being presented in the court after and after asked the defendant for their pleading on each charge/allegation. If the defendant pleads guilty to all charges/allegations, then the court would continue with sentencing/compensation if they plead not guilty to any of the charges/allegations then carry on with the trial.

 

Opening Statements: 

         Have opening statements first presented by the Prosecutor and then by the Defense. There are very few objections that can be lodged during opening statements. This shouldn't come up, but if it does, just remember these improper things.

           Argument During Opening:

                 Opening statements are not a delivery of argument about the evidence, they are an outline of the evidence that parties believe will be presented and should be an explanation of the case.

 

Prosecution Case:

         The Prosecution presents their case with evidence and witnesses. Evidence that lacks its own self-explanatory context cannot be presented alone with witnesses and could be called as an objection marked under "Lack of Foundation".

Defense Cross-Examination:

         The defense cross-examination is where the Defense may ask the Prosecution Witness questions and is when Leading is allowed.

Re-Direct and Re-Cross:

         Re-direct follows the same path as the prosecution case and the Re-Cross follows the same as the Defense Cross-Examination. This will go until both sides have no further questions for the witness.

 

Defense Case:

          The Defense presents their case with evidence and witnesses. (Once again, evidence that lacks its own self-explanatory context cannot be presented alone with witnesses and could be marked as an objection under "Lack of Foundation".

Prosecution Cross-Examination:

        The prosecution cross-examination is where the prosecution may ask the Defense witness questions and is when Leading is allowed.

Re-Direct and Re-Cross:

       Re-Direct follows the same as the Defense case and re-cross follows the same as the Prosecution cross-examination. This will go until both sides have no further questions for the witness.

 

Closing Arguments:

       Each side presents a summation that closes off the case with their necessary arguments before a Verdict is made.

 

Verdict:

        The judge overseeing the case delivers a verdict based on the facts and law referenced within the case.

 

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